Robert Perkins
Using high-speed photography and digital image correlation techniques, engineers study how friction along a faultline evolves during an earthquake.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Taking advantage of airborne radar tools, Caltech researchers provide two possible explanations for a series of unusual earthquakes seen in Iceland during a period of volcanic activity that started in August last year.
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
A new way of using the technologies aboard JPL's OCO-2 satellite allows researchers to monitor plant health and productivity on a global scale.
Kimm Fesenmaier
New device created by Caltech chemists opens the door for many new applications in a variety of fields from astronomy to chemistry and beyond.
Kathy Svitil
Weight of water molecules may be key to formation of its giant storms.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Smartphones could contribute to early warning systems for large earthquakes, according to a new study.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Where are they now? Their demise might have cleared the way for the formation of planets like home sweet Earth.
Ker Than
Using new computer models that account for friction, scientists at Caltech find that the Antarctic ice sheets are more sensitive to climate change than we thought.
Kimm Fesenmaier
A team of researchers has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet. The geologists say that the ancient canyon—thousands of feet deep in places—effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Caltech researchers use robotic ocean gliders to study how warm water is making its way to Antarctic ice sheets—and how this warming ultimately leads to rising ocean levels.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Using a new analytical technique, Caltech researchers studying the rock record uncover new information about the sulfur cycle on early Earth and what that could mean for the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere.
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