Whitney Clavin
Three members of the Caltech faculty are among this year's Sloan Research Fellows.
Rod Pyle
July 14 marks 50 years of visual reconnaissance of the solar system by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), beginning with Mariner 4's flyby of Mars in 1965.
Douglas Smith
Feynman Teaching Award winner Mike Brown ventures into new fields of instruction: the Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC, and the "flipped" classroom, which inverts the traditional arrangement of listening to lectures in class and doing assignments at home.
Kathy Svitil
Weight of water molecules may be key to formation of its giant storms.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Where are they now? Their demise might have cleared the way for the formation of planets like home sweet Earth.
Lori Dajose
Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, has been awarded the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize of the American Astronomical Society (AAS).
Lori Dajose
Konstantin Batygin (MS '10, PhD '12), an assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, was recently included in Forbes's "30 Under 30" list in the science category, and described by the editors as being "the next physics rock star."
Douglas Smith
Two and a half billion years ago, single-celled organisms called cyanobacteria harnessed sunlight to split water molecules, producing energy to power their cells and releasing oxygen into an atmosphere that had previously had none. These early environmental engineers are responsible for the life we see around us today, and much more besides. At 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 19, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium, Professor of Geobiology Woodward "Woody" Fischer will describe how they transformed the planet. Admission is free.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Results from NASA's Kepler planet-hunting mission have indicated that the most common planets in the galaxy are super-Earths—those that are bigger than Earth but smaller than Neptune. Heather Knutson and her colleagues are using space telescopes to try to find out more about these worlds.
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Caltech researchers work to make sure that NASA's newly launched satellite provides accurate data about carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere.
Douglas Smith
In 1964, Caltech astronomy professor Guido Münch and Jet Propulsion Laboratory space scientists Lewis Kaplan and Hyron Spinrad pushed the world's second-largest telescope to its limits and dashed—at least for the next few decades—any hopes of finding liquid water on Mars.
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