Robert Perkins
Caltech's Konstantin Batygin has been named one of the 2017 Packard Fellows in Science and Engineering.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech and JPL researchers identify a process involving UV light from the sun that helps explain how a moderately dense martian atmosphere 3.8 billion years ago could have evolved into the current thin one without invoking a missing carbon reservoir.
Ramanuj Basu
In September, the NASA/JPL Cassini mission began the last two years of the Solstice Mission. We recently spoke with JPL director Charles Elachi to gain his unique perspective on Cassini's achievements—and what will come next.
Douglas Smith
Caltech geochemist Clair Patterson (1922–1995) helped galvanize the environmental movement 50 years ago when he announced that highly toxic lead could be found essentially everywhere on Earth, including in our own bodies—and that very little of it was due to natural causes.
Lori Dajose
Yuk Yung, the Smits Family Professor of Planetary Science, has received the 2015 Gerard P. Kuiper Prize from the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences.
Rod Pyle
July 14 marks 50 years of visual reconnaissance of the solar system by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), beginning with Mariner 4's flyby of Mars in 1965.
Douglas Smith
Feynman Teaching Award winner Mike Brown ventures into new fields of instruction: the Massive Open Online Course, or MOOC, and the "flipped" classroom, which inverts the traditional arrangement of listening to lectures in class and doing assignments at home.
Kathy Svitil
Weight of water molecules may be key to formation of its giant storms.
Kimm Fesenmaier
Where are they now? Their demise might have cleared the way for the formation of planets like home sweet Earth.
Lori Dajose
Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, has been awarded the Newton Lacy Pierce Prize of the American Astronomical Society (AAS).
Lori Dajose
Konstantin Batygin (MS '10, PhD '12), an assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, was recently included in Forbes's "30 Under 30" list in the science category, and described by the editors as being "the next physics rock star."
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